May 7, 2008

Cherry Creek, Arizona

This area is great for Hiking, exploring native american (indian) ruins and more.
There are numerous springs in the area as well! After the 2007-8 heavy winter rains the road is in pretty bad shape and a high ground clearance preferably 4WD is recommended.
As always the Native American ruins found in this area are a precious resource and part of history. Please take only pictures and leave it as you found it.
This Google earth image is from my SPOT personal locator. I use it in addition to my GPS to track my progress or send an okay message to loved ones. (I can also send a help message if I have mechanical issues or a 911 message if it is life threatening)Check out www.findmespot.com for more info.
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I met up with "SWR" as we call him. And then Blknblu at another gas station.
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Once we got to Roosevelt Lake we took a break and aired down our tires for smoother ride on the bumpy Cherry Creek Road.

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Expect to keep a healthy distance because of the thick dust and it helps to use walkie talkies or two way radios of some sort to keep in touch.

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There are some ranches along the way that have been here for a long time.
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An interesting thing to see are the many corrals along the route. I noticed this one had a fence made out of World War II portable landing strip pieces. Many of these pieces are now used as border fencing or "Sand Ladders" for offroaders. These pieces of metal have seen more of the world and last centuries history than most people.
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If you travel in the winter months this river crossing can be impassible. On this early dry may day it was just a refreshing spot to stop.
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Along the way there are also remnants of past ranches and homes that didn't work out.
This one is right next to the main road and can't be missed. The home shows many generations with Adobe mud brick as the main construction with many layers of newer building materials placed on top of it.
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Notice the fallen Adobe Bricks turning back into the earth from which they came.
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This water crossing can be difficult to pass anytime of year depending on rainfall. The floor of the crossing is slick boulders, 4x4 is recommended. Sometimes the Ranchers in this area have to park their trucks here and take a boat home, literally.
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This sign lets you know you are getting closer.
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In the midst of this dry desert you come upon some amazingly lush areas thanks to spring waters that flow year round.
This first lush area denotes the beginning of one of the great hikes in this area.
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We only did part of this hike, but for those who can muster the 2 or so hour hike up you're rewarded with some great Indian ruins.

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Is this Arizona!?
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In this little jungle area there were flowers blooming like it was still spring, although in reality the AZ desert air had dried up most of the state.
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Here is an example of the washed out area that may be difficult without high ground clearance and 4WD.

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Again, the views are amazing.
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On such a remote road its odd to see so much public information about the area. Stop and read the information. Also, there is a good chance that if you see a sign a trail to some ruins is near by.
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Here is another area that can be tough for the inexperienced off highway driver.
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Make sure you stop to check out the wildlife! Its amazing how this little oasis has different types of species than what one normally sees in the desert.
Credit for this shot goes to my new G9 Canon Camera.
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The desert plants are loosing their bloom and turning brown.
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Right when you think you are relegated to the desert terrain the road leads into another spring and a lush green area.
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The terrain again changes from scrub brush to trees and red clay dirt. It reminds me of my travels in Southern Utah.
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Life abounds in the strangest of places!
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The trail climbs some switch backs sharply and reaches a water tank, the main dirt road to the town of Young (HW288) and the end of the Cherry Creek road.
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The amount of side roads, hikes and future exploration possibilities was amazing.
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If you do the road in reverse you can see the turn by this large sign.
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The drive back to Phoenix from this area is great. The sunset over Roosevelt lake is beautiful.
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Next to the bridge is a good area to air back up and head home.
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2 comments:

Terry a. Baker said...

Awesome looking adventure I'd like to do someday, do you have any GPS coordinates available? How long is the total trail?

terry
fjcrawler@gmail.com

Timeless said...

Wow, what a nice ride, I feel like I was on it. I miss Arizona and Deserts in general. I'm a desert rat at heart and for the moment for the last 6 years resident of Sweden. I litterally hate the cold, but always appreciated coolness of Oasis when I came to them in the deserts southwest.

Last time I heard the name Cherry Creek was when Junior Monner's mother told him his dad, Ace Bonner got drunk and drove off the Cherry Creek Road.

Thanks again for the story and pics here. I'll have to bookmark you and take some more tours. Well after I read all the archives.

Kevin


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